Publications

2013
Nagy, Gregory. 2013. “Virgil’s verse invitus, regina … and its poetic antecedents.” More modoque: Die Wurzeln der europäischen Kultur und deren Rezeption im Orient und Okzident, edited by P Fodor, G Mayer, M Monostori, K Szovák, and L Takács, 155–165. Budapest: Forschungszentrum für Humanwissenschaften der Ungarischen Akademie der Wissenschaften. Festschrift für Miklós Maróth zum siebzigsten Geburtstag.
Weiss, Naomi A. 2013. “The Visual Language of Nero's Harbor Sestertii.” Memoirs of the American Academy at Rome 58: 65–81.
Coleman, Kathleen, and Rebecca Benefiel. 2013. “The graffiti.” Excavations at Zeugma Conducted by Oxford Archaeology, edited by William Aylward, 1: 178–191. Los Altos, CA: Packard Humanities Institute.
The Ancient Greek Hero in 24 Hours
Nagy, Gregory. 2013. The Ancient Greek Hero in 24 Hours. Cambridge, MA; London: The Belknap Press of Harvard University Press. Publisher's Version Abstract

The ancient Greeks’ concept of “the hero” was very different from what we understand by the term today, Gregory Nagy argues—and it is only through analyzing their historical contexts that we can truly understand Achilles, Odysseus, Oedipus, and Herakles.

In Greek tradition, a hero was a human, male or female, of the remote past, who was endowed with superhuman abilities by virtue of being descended from an immortal god. Despite their mortality, heroes, like the gods, were objects of cult worship. Nagy examines this distinctively religious notion of the hero in its many dimensions, in texts spanning the eighth to fourth centuries BCE: the Homeric Iliad and Odyssey; tragedies of Aeschylus, Sophocles, and Euripides; songs of Sappho and Pindar; and dialogues of Plato. All works are presented in English translation, with attention to the subtleties of the original Greek, and are often further illuminated by illustrations taken from Athenian vase paintings.

The fifth-century BCE historian Herodotus said that to read Homer is to be a civilized person. In twenty-four installments, based on the Harvard University course Nagy has taught and refined since the late 1970s, The Ancient Greek Hero in 24 Hours offers an exploration of civilization’s roots in the Homeric epics and other Classical literature, a lineage that continues to challenge and inspire us today.

The Poetics of Consent: Collective Decision Making and the Iliad
Elmer, David F. 2013. The Poetics of Consent: Collective Decision Making and the Iliad. Baltimore, MD: John Hopkins University Press. Publisher's Version Abstract

The Poetics of Consent breaks new ground in Homeric studies by interpreting the Iliad’s depictions of political action in terms of the poetic forces that shaped the Iliad itself. Arguing that consensus is a central theme of the epic, David Elmer analyzes in detail scenes in which the poem’s three political communities—Achaeans, Trojans, and Olympian gods—engage in the process of collective decision making.

These scenes reflect an awareness of the negotiation involved in reconciling rival versions of the Iliad over centuries. They also point beyond the Iliad’s world of gods and heroes to the here-and-now of the poem’s performance and reception, in which the consensus over the shape and meaning of the Iliadic tradition is continuously evolving.

Elmer synthesizes ideas and methods from literary and political theory, classical philology, anthropology, and folklore studies to construct an alternative to conventional understandings of the Iliad’s politics. The Poetics of Consent reveals the ways in which consensus and collective decision making determined the authoritative account of the Trojan War that we know as the Iliad.

2012
Grammaticus multi nominis. Festschrift for Alan J. Nussbaum.
Rau, J., A. Cooper, B. W. Fortson, and M. Weiss, ed. 2012. Grammaticus multi nominis. Festschrift for Alan J. Nussbaum.. Ann Arbor: Beech Stave Press. Publisher's Version
L’Organisation des spectacles dans le monde romain
Coleman, Kathleen, and Jocelyne Nelis-Clément, ed. 2012. L’Organisation des spectacles dans le monde romain. Vandoeuvres: Fondation Hardt. Publisher's Version Abstract

Contents:

Preface by P. DUCREY; Introduction by K. COLEMAN and J. NELIS-CLEMENT;J. NOLLE "Stadtprägungen des Ostens und die 'explosion agonistique': Überlegungen zu Umfang, Aussagen und Hintergründen der Propagierung von Agonen auf den Prägungen der Städte des griechischen Ostens"; O. M. VAN NIJF "Political games"; C. KOKKINIA "Games vs. buildings as euergetic choices"; M. L. CALDELLI "Associazioni di artisti a Roma: una messa a punto"; J-P. THUILLIER "L'organisation des ludi circenses: les quatre factions (République, Haut-Empire)"; R. WEBB "The nature and representation of competition in pantomime and mime"; G. CHAMBERLAND "La mémoire des spectacles: l'autoreprésentation des donateurs"; C. JONES "The organization of spectacle in Late Antiquity".

Rau, Jeremy. 2012. “Notes on Stative Verbal Roots, the Caland System, and Primary Verbal Morphology in Indo-Iranian and Indo-European.” Multi nominis grammaticus. Festchrift for Alan J. Nussbaum, edited by A Cooper, J Rau, and M Weiss, 255–273. Ann Arbor: Beech Stave Press.
Weiss, Naomi A. 2012. “Recognition and Identity in Euripides' Ion .” Recognition and Modes of Knowledge: Anagnorisis from Antiquity to Contemporary Theory, edited by T Russo, 33–50. Edmonton: University of Alberta Press.
Nagy, Gregory. 2012. “Signs of Hero Cult in Homeric Poetry.” Homeric Contexts, edited by Franco Montanari, Antonios Rengakos, and Christos Tsagalis, 17–61. Berlin: De Gruyter.
Thomas, Richard F. 2012. “The Streets of Rome: The Classical Dylan.” Reception and the Classics: An Interdisciplinary Approach to the Classical Tradition, edited by William Brockliss, Pramit Chaudhuri, Ayelet Haimson Lushkov, and Katherine Wasdin, 134–159. Cambridge; New York: Cambridge University Press.
Thomas, Richard F. 2012. “Thoughts on the Virgilian hexameter.” Multi nominis grammaticus. Festchrift for Alan J. Nussbaum, edited by Adam I Cooper, Jeremy Rau, and Michael Weiss, 306–314. Ann Arbor: Beech Stave Press.
Ziolkowski, Jan M. 2012. “Walter of Aquitaine in Spanish Ballad Tradition.” Child's Children: Ballad Study and its Legacies, edited by Joseph Harris and Barbara Hillers, 171–185. Trier: Wissenschaftlicher Verlag Trier.
Coleman, Kathleen. 2012. “Bureaucratic language in the correspondence between Pliny and Trajan.” Transactions of the American Philological Association 142 (2): 189–238. Abstract

 This article identifies and analyzes bureaucratic features in the language employed by Pliny and Trajan in Epistles 10 as an example of communication between two officials of senior but unequal status who were engaged in managing provincial affairs in the Roman empire. 

Virgil: Aeneid Book XII
Tarrant, Richard, ed. 2012. Virgil: Aeneid Book XII. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. Publisher's Version Abstract

Book XII brings Virgil's Aeneid to a close, as the long-delayed single combat between Aeneas and Turnus ends with Turnus' death – a finale that many readers find more unsettling than triumphant. In this, the first detailed single-volume commentary on the book in any language, Professor Tarrant explores Virgil's complex portrayal of the opposing champions, his use and transformation of earlier poetry (Homer's in particular) and his shaping of the narrative in its final phases. In addition to the linguistic and thematic commentary, the volume contains a substantial introduction that discusses the larger literary and historical issues raised by the poem's conclusion; other sections include accounts of Virgil's metre, later treatments of the book's events in art and music, and the transmission of the text. The edition is designed for upper-level undergraduates and graduate students and will also be of interest to scholars of Latin literature.

2011
Thomas, Richard F. 2011. “Epigram and Propertian Elegy’s Epigram Riffs: Radical Poet/Radical Critics.” Latin Elegy and Hellenistic Epigram: A Tale of Two Genres at Rome, edited by Alison Keith, 67–85. Newcastle upon Tyne: Cambridge Scholars Publishing.
Rau, Jeremy. 2011. “Indo-European Kinship Terminology: *ph₂tr-ou̯-/ph₂tr̥-u̯- and its Derivatives.” Historische Sprachforschung 124: 1–25.
Roilos, Panagiotis. 2011. “Orality, Ritual, and the Dialectics of Performance.” Medieval Oral Literature, edited by K Reichl, 225–249. Berlin: De Gruyter.
Horace: Odes I V and Carmen Saeculare
Thomas, Richard F, ed. 2011. Horace: Odes I V and Carmen Saeculare. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. Publisher's Version Abstract

The Carmen Saeculare was composed and published in 17 BCE as Horace was returning to the genre of lyric which he had abandoned six years earlier; the fourth book of Odes is in part a response to this poem, the only commissioned poem we know from the period. The hardening of the political situation, with the Republic a thing of the past and the Augustan succession in the air, threw the problematic issue of praise into fresh relief, and at the same time provided an impulse towards the nostalgia represented by the poet's private world. Professor Thomas provides an introduction and commentary (the first full commentary in English since the nineteenth century) to each of the poems, exploring their status as separate lyric artefacts and their place in the larger web of the book. The edition is intended primarily for upper-level undergraduates and graduate students, but is also important for scholars.

2010
Ziolkowski, Jan M. 2010. “Do Actions Speak Louder Than Words? The Scope and Role of Pronuntiatio in the Latin Rhetorical Tradition, With Special Reference to the Cistercians.” Rhetoric beyond Words: Delight and Persuasion in the Arts of the Middle Ages, edited by Mary Carruthers, 124–150. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

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