Classical Philology

Jan Ziolkowski

Jan Ziolkowski

Arthur Kingsley Porter Professor of Medieval Latin
Director of the Dumbarton Oaks Research Library and Collection

Research Interests: Medieval Latin literature, especially narrative; education (grammar, rhetoric, and dialectic), poetics, and literary criticism and theory in the Middle Ages; folktales and popular culture in medieval Latin sources; Latin-vernacular relations  Read more about Jan Ziolkowski

Boylston 216
p: 617.496.6062
Office Hours: Tuesday by appointment (contact Marlee Clayton at claytonm@doaks.org).
Gregory Nagy

Gregory Nagy

Francis Jones Professor of Classical Greek Literature and Professor of Comparative Literature
Director of the Center for Hellenic Studies

Research Interests: Archaic and Classical Greek poetry and prose; rhetoric, linguistics, metrics, traditions 

Read more about Gregory Nagy

Boylston 228
p: 617.495.1941
Office Hours: By appointment.
Nagy, Gregory. 2012. “Signs of Hero Cult in Homeric Poetry.” Homeric Contexts, edited by Franco Montanari, Antonios Rengakos, and Christos Tsagalis, 17–61. Berlin: De Gruyter, 17–61.
Nagy, Gregory. 2013. “Virgil’s verse invitus, regina … and its poetic antecedents.” More modoque: Die Wurzeln der europäischen Kultur und deren Rezeption im Orient und Okzident, edited by P Fodor, G Mayer, M Monostori, K Szovák, and L Takács, 155–165. Budapest: Forschungszentrum für Humanwissenschaften der Ungarischen Akademie der Wissenschaften. Festschrift für Miklós Maróth zum siebzigsten Geburtstag, 155–165.
Thomas, Richard F. 2012. “Thoughts on the Virgilian hexameter.” Multi nominis grammaticus. Festchrift for Alan J. Nussbaum, edited by Adam I Cooper, Jeremy Rau, and Michael Weiss, 306–314. Ann Arbor: Beech Stave Press, 306–314.
Livingston, Ivy J. 2014. “Pro Cicerone: In Defense of Cicero in the Latin Classroom.” American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages. ProgramAbstract

This session presents a unit of study centered on the life and writings of Cicero, a pivotal figure in Roman history and one of the best-documented. Cicero’s life, intersecting with many of Rome’s best-known figures, provides a perfect point of access to many cultural themes, while engaging students with primary texts of undisputed virtuosity.

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