Classical Archaeology

Doctor of Philosophy in Classical Archaeology

The field of Classical Archaeology is understood to cover Aegean, Greek, Etruscan, and Roman art and archaeology. Faculty will also arrange work on a cross-departmental basis in related fields such as Egyptian, Near Eastern, Anatolian, Punic, Byzantine, and other areas of European art and archaeology.

Prerequisites. Entering students are expected to have competence in both Greek and Latin sufficient to take courses numbered above 100 in one of these languages (the "major language"), and above the beginning level of the other (the "minor language"). In exceptional circumstances and with the approval of the director of graduate studies, substitution of another ancient language in the place of the minor language may be arranged.

Some preparation in German and either French or Italian should be undertaken before admission to the program.

Academic Residence. As for the PhD in Classical Philology: Minimum of two years of full-time study (a combination of 16 half-courses, 301s or units of TIME). Students are not normally permitted to take more than two courses numbered 301 before sitting for their General Examinations.

Program of Study. Such as to foster knowledge of the archaeology and monuments of the classical world in their historical and social context.

  1. Proseminar: Taken in the first year. Pass/Fail.
  2. Classical Archaeology: four seminars, of which at least one shall be on a Greek topic and another on a Roman topic. One of the four may be in a related field.
  3. Languages and Literatures: three half-courses at or above the 100 level, of which at least one shall be in the "major language" and another in the "minor language," and one of which shall be a seminar.
  4. Ancient History: three half-courses, of which at least one shall be in Greek and another in Roman history. One of the three shall be a seminar.
  5. Other Fields: three half-courses, of which one must be in non-classical art history, and the other two are to be chosen from fields such as anthropology, art history, epigraphy, numismatics, palaeography, and papyrology, or a related field at the discretion of the director of graduate studies.

Modern Languages. As for the PhD in Classical Philology: The demonstration of a reading knowledge of French or Italian and of German, to be tested by the Department (with the aid of dictionaries). This requirement must be fulfilled before the Special Examinations are taken. Tests are normally administered in September, February, and April.

General Examinations. All students will, normally by the end of May of the second year, take General Examinations comprising three parts:

  1. A written three-hour examination on the "major language," consisting of six passages for translation (three prose, three verse) from the works prescribed in the reading list for that language.
  2. A three-hour written examination testing knowledge of major and representative archaeological sites, monuments, artifacts, and works of art of the Greco-Roman world from the Bronze Age to the Late Roman period (including pre-Roman Italy) within their historical and cultural contexts, as covered in up-to-date handbooks of the discipline.
  3. A one-and-one-half hour oral examination testing general knowledge of major sites, monuments, artifacts, and works of art of the Greco-Roman world from the Bronze Age to the Late Roman period (including pre-Roman Italy) within their historical and cultural contexts, employing the terms, concepts, approaches, and methods typically used in the discipline. This examiners may use visual evidence (including objects) to prompt questions. The examining committee will consist of three faculty members, one of whom will be appointed to moderate the proceedings and to intervene at his or her discretion.

These examinations may be repeated only once in the event of failure. If a student fails only one part of the examination, then he or she need only repeat that part.

Special Examinations. All students will, normally at the end of the third graduate year, take a two-hour oral examination in three topics, of which at least one should be Greek and one Roman. The choice of topics should be submitted for approval by the graduate committee at the time of the General Examinations, or within a month following them. Preparation for this examination will be by independent study, with regular supervision by a faculty member for each part of the examination. These examinations may be repeated only once in the event of failure.

Travel. After passing the Special Examinations, students are expected to spend one year either in academic programs at the American School of Classical Studies in Athens or at the American Academy in Rome, or at other institutions abroad which house materials relevant to their major area of research. In addition, students are strongly encouraged to acquire fieldwork experience

Dissertation Regulations. The regulations governing the dissertation are the same as for the PhD in Classical Philology.