Poetry

2015
Transitorium: Poems
Rapti, Vassiliki. 2015. Transitorium: Poems. Boston, MA: Somerset Hall Press. Publisher's VersionAbstract

"Owner of a lonely, albeit enormously generous, heart, and happily endowed with a knowledge of Western as well as non-Western cultures, Vassiliki Rapti offers us here a lovely, if brief series of texts flavored to practically every taste found among serious readers of literature. In style and forms at one and the same time old and new, classical and iconoclastic, heavy and light, she writes poems that provoke profound reflections on the infinite significance(s) of key moments in our lives, including birth and death." - Stamos Metzidakis

2014
Weiss, Naomi A. 2014. “The Antiphonal Ending of Euripides' Iphigenia in Aulis (1475–1532).” Classical Philology 109: 119–129.
Roilos, Panagiotis. 2014. “Unshapely Bodies and Beautifying Embellishments: The Ancient Epics in Byzantium, Allegorical Hermeneutics, and the Case of Ioannes Diakonos Galenos.” Jahrbuch der Österreichischen Byzantinistik, edited by Kislinger Ewald, 64: 231–246. Wien: Verlag der Österreichischen Akademie der Wissenschaften, 64, 231–246.
Coleman, Kathleen. 2014. “Melior's plane tree: an introduction to the ancient garden.” Le jardin dans l’Antiquité, edited by Kathleen Coleman, 1–26. Vandoeuvres: Fondation Hardt, 1–26.
2013
Nagy, Gregory. 2013. “The Delian Maidens and their relevance to choral mimesis in classical drama.” Choral Mediations in Greek Tragedy, edited by Renaud Gagné and Marianne Hopman, 227–256. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 227–256.
Elmer, David F. 2013. “In Memoriam John Miles Foley (1947–2012).” Folklore 124 (1): 104–106.
Elmer, David F. 2013. “The Milman Parry Collection of Oral Literature.” Oral Tradition [Internet] 28 (2): 341–354. Publisher's Version
Elmer, David F. 2013. “Poetry's Politics in Archaic Greek Epic and Lyric.” Oral Tradition [Internet] 28 (1): 143–166. Publisher's Version
Nagy, Gregory. 2013. “Virgil’s verse invitus, regina … and its poetic antecedents.” More modoque: Die Wurzeln der europäischen Kultur und deren Rezeption im Orient und Okzident, edited by P Fodor, G Mayer, M Monostori, K Szovák, and L Takács, 155–165. Budapest: Forschungszentrum für Humanwissenschaften der Ungarischen Akademie der Wissenschaften. Festschrift für Miklós Maróth zum siebzigsten Geburtstag, 155–165.
2012
Henrichs, Albert. 2012. “Animal Sacrifice in Greek Tragedy: Ritual, Metaphor, Problematizations.” Greek and Roman Animal Sacrifice: Ancient Victims, Modern Observers, edited by CA Faraone and FS Naiden, 180–194. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 180–194.
Weiss, Naomi A. 2012. “Recognition and Identity in Euripides' Ion .” Recognition and Modes of Knowledge: Anagnorisis from Antiquity to Contemporary Theory, edited by T Russo, 33–50. Edmonton: University of Alberta Press, 33–50.
Nagy, Gregory. 2012. “Signs of Hero Cult in Homeric Poetry.” Homeric Contexts, edited by Franco Montanari, Antonios Rengakos, and Christos Tsagalis, 17–61. Berlin: De Gruyter, 17–61.
Thomas, Richard F. 2012. “The Streets of Rome: The Classical Dylan.” Reception and the Classics: An Interdisciplinary Approach to the Classical Tradition, edited by William Brockliss, Pramit Chaudhuri, Ayelet Haimson Lushkov, and Katherine Wasdin, 134–159. Cambridge; New York: Cambridge University Press, 134–159.
Thomas, Richard F. 2012. “Thoughts on the Virgilian hexameter.” Multi nominis grammaticus. Festchrift for Alan J. Nussbaum, edited by Adam I Cooper, Jeremy Rau, and Michael Weiss, 306–314. Ann Arbor: Beech Stave Press, 306–314.
Virgil: Aeneid Book XII
Tarrant, Richard, ed. 2012. Virgil: Aeneid Book XII. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. Publisher's VersionAbstract

Book XII brings Virgil's Aeneid to a close, as the long-delayed single combat between Aeneas and Turnus ends with Turnus' death – a finale that many readers find more unsettling than triumphant. In this, the first detailed single-volume commentary on the book in any language, Professor Tarrant explores Virgil's complex portrayal of the opposing champions, his use and transformation of earlier poetry (Homer's in particular) and his shaping of the narrative in its final phases. In addition to the linguistic and thematic commentary, the volume contains a substantial introduction that discusses the larger literary and historical issues raised by the poem's conclusion; other sections include accounts of Virgil's metre, later treatments of the book's events in art and music, and the transmission of the text. The edition is designed for upper-level undergraduates and graduate students and will also be of interest to scholars of Latin literature.

2011
Thomas, Richard F. 2011. “Epigram and Propertian Elegy’s Epigram Riffs: Radical Poet/Radical Critics.” Latin Elegy and Hellenistic Epigram: A Tale of Two Genres at Rome, edited by Alison Keith, 67–85. Newcastle upon Tyne: Cambridge Scholars Publishing, 67–85.
Horace: Odes I V and Carmen Saeculare
Thomas, Richard F, ed. 2011. Horace: Odes I V and Carmen Saeculare. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. Publisher's VersionAbstract

The Carmen Saeculare was composed and published in 17 BCE as Horace was returning to the genre of lyric which he had abandoned six years earlier; the fourth book of Odes is in part a response to this poem, the only commissioned poem we know from the period. The hardening of the political situation, with the Republic a thing of the past and the Augustan succession in the air, threw the problematic issue of praise into fresh relief, and at the same time provided an impulse towards the nostalgia represented by the poet's private world. Professor Thomas provides an introduction and commentary (the first full commentary in English since the nineteenth century) to each of the poems, exploring their status as separate lyric artefacts and their place in the larger web of the book. The edition is intended primarily for upper-level undergraduates and graduate students, but is also important for scholars.

2006
Tarrant, Richard J. 2006. “Seeing Seneca Whole?.” Seeing Seneca Whole: Perspectives on Philosophy, Poetry and Politics, edited by Katharina Volk and Gareth D Williams, 1–17. Leiden: Brill, 1–17.
2005
Tarrant, Richard J. 2005. “Roads Not Taken: Untold Stories in Ovid's Metamorphoses.” Materiali e discussioni per l'analisi dei testi classici 54: 65–89.
2004
Tarrant, Richard J. 2004. “The Last Book of the Aeneid.” Syllecta Classica 15: 103–129.

Pages