Art and Archaeology

2014
Ancient Bronzes through a Modern Lens: Introductory Essays on the Study of Ancient Mediterranean and Near Eastern Bronzes
Ebbinghaus, S., ed. 2014. Ancient Bronzes through a Modern Lens: Introductory Essays on the Study of Ancient Mediterranean and Near Eastern Bronzes. Cambridge, MA: Harvard Art Museums. Publisher's VersionAbstract

With contributions by Lisa M. Anderson, Francesca G. Bewer, Ruth Bielfeldt, Susanne Ebbinghaus, Katherine Eremin, Seán Hemingway, Henry Lie, Carol C. Mattusch, Josef Riederer, and Adrian Stähli.

This publication brings together prominent art historians, conservators, and scientists to discuss fresh approaches to the study of ancient Mediterranean and Near Eastern works of bronze. Featuring significant bronzes from the Harvard Art Museums’ holdings as well as other museum collections, the volume’s eight essays present technical and formal analyses in a format that will be useful for both general readers and students of ancient art. The text provides an overview of ancient manufacturing processes as well as modern methods of scientific examination, and it focuses on objects as diverse as large-scale statuary and more utilitarian armor, vessels, and lamps. Filling a current gap in the art historical literature, this book offers a much-needed, accessible introduction to ancient bronzes.

2013
Weiss, Naomi A. 2013. “The Visual Language of Nero's Harbor Sestertii.” Memoirs of the American Academy at Rome 58: 65–81.
Coleman, Kathleen, and Rebecca Benefiel. 2013. “The graffiti.” Excavations at Zeugma Conducted by Oxford Archaeology, edited by William Aylward, 1: 178–191. Los Altos, CA: Packard Humanities Institute, 1, 178–191.
2006
Martial: Liber Spectaculorum
Coleman, Kathleen M. 2006. Martial: Liber Spectaculorum. Oxford: Oxford University Press. Publisher's VersionAbstract

This book is the first full-scale edition of the so-called Liber spectaculorum by Martial. A comprehensive introduction addresses the role of epigram in commemorating monuments and occasions, the connection between spectacle and imperial panegyric in Martial's oeuvre, characteristics of the collection, possible circumstances of composition and 'publication', transmission of the text, and related issues. Each epigram is followed by an apparatus criticus, an English translation, and a detailed commentary on linguistic, literary, and historical matters, adducing extensive evidence from epigraphy and art as well as literary sources. The book is accompanied by four concordances, five tables, two maps, 30 plates, and an appendix.