Publications

2015
2015. “Using Technology for Good in the Latin Classroom.” American Classical League Summer Institute. Program
Transitorium: Poems
Rapti, Vassiliki. 2015. Transitorium: Poems. Boston, MA: Somerset Hall Press. Publisher's VersionAbstract

"Owner of a lonely, albeit enormously generous, heart, and happily endowed with a knowledge of Western as well as non-Western cultures, Vassiliki Rapti offers us here a lovely, if brief series of texts flavored to practically every taste found among serious readers of literature. In style and forms at one and the same time old and new, classical and iconoclastic, heavy and light, she writes poems that provoke profound reflections on the infinite significance(s) of key moments in our lives, including birth and death." - Stamos Metzidakis

Coleman, Kathleen M. 2015. “Written in Stone: Teaching with Inscriptions.” The Phyllis Katz Lecture. ProgramAbstract

CANE Summer Institute Public Lecture.

2014
Ancient Bronzes through a Modern Lens: Introductory Essays on the Study of Ancient Mediterranean and Near Eastern Bronzes
Ebbinghaus, S., ed. 2014. Ancient Bronzes through a Modern Lens: Introductory Essays on the Study of Ancient Mediterranean and Near Eastern Bronzes. Cambridge, MA: Harvard Art Museums. Publisher's VersionAbstract

With contributions by Lisa M. Anderson, Francesca G. Bewer, Ruth Bielfeldt, Susanne Ebbinghaus, Katherine Eremin, Seán Hemingway, Henry Lie, Carol C. Mattusch, Josef Riederer, and Adrian Stähli.

This publication brings together prominent art historians, conservators, and scientists to discuss fresh approaches to the study of ancient Mediterranean and Near Eastern works of bronze. Featuring significant bronzes from the Harvard Art Museums’ holdings as well as other museum collections, the volume’s eight essays present technical and formal analyses in a format that will be useful for both general readers and students of ancient art. The text provides an overview of ancient manufacturing processes as well as modern methods of scientific examination, and it focuses on objects as diverse as large-scale statuary and more utilitarian armor, vessels, and lamps. Filling a current gap in the art historical literature, this book offers a much-needed, accessible introduction to ancient bronzes.

Verso una poetica rituale
Yatromanolakis, D., and P. Roilos. 2014. Verso una poetica rituale. Lecce, Italia: Argo. Publisher's VersionAbstract

Il modello teorico di una poetica rituale proposta da D. Yatromanolakis e O. Roilos fonda una nuova problematica che si basa sulla inscrizione di forme rituali in più vasti sistemi d'espressione culturali e sociopolitici all'interno di varie tradizioni del mondo greco.
Il "caso greco", col suo materiale sterminato, contrassegnato da svariate continuità e discontinuità, spesso pieno di rimaneggiamenti ideologicamente ispirati nell'arco di tre millenni, offre un terreno certamente impegnativo ma fecondo per indagini comparative.
L'ipotesi è verificata in tre precisi ambiti di ricerca: Saffo e la lirica greca arcaica, il romanzo bizantino del XII secolo e l'opera poetica di Odysseas Elytis.

The Virgil Encyclopedia
Thomas, Richard F, and Jan M Ziolkowski, ed. 2014. The Virgil Encyclopedia. Chichester: Wiley-Blackwell, 1600. Publisher's VersionAbstract

The Virgil Encyclopedia is the first comprehensive reference volume to be published in English on Publius Vergilius Maro, the classical Roman poet whose works and thoughts have been at the center of Western literary, cultural, artistic, and pedagogical traditions for more than two millennia. Through more than 2,200 carefully researched entries, scholars and students alike are provided with an in-depth treatment of all aspects of Virgil’s poetry and his immeasurable influence that continues to the present day.

Le jardin dans l’Antiquité
Coleman, Kathleen, ed. 2014. Le jardin dans l’Antiquité. Vandoeuvres: Fondation Hardt. Publisher's VersionAbstract

Contents:

P. DUCREY, "Préface"
K. COLEMAN, "Melior's plane tree: an introduction to the ancient garden"
C. E. LOEBEN, "Der Garten im und am Grab - Götter in Gärten und Gärten für Götter: reale und dargestellte Gärten im Alten Ägypten"
S. DALLEY, "From Mesopotamian temples as sacred groves to the date-palm motif in Greek art and architecture"
E. PRIOUX, "Parler de jardin pour parler de créations littéraires"
R. TAYLOR, "Movement, vision, and quotation in the gardens of Herod the Great"
A. MARZANO, "Roman gardens, military conquests, and elite self-representation"
B. BERGMANN, "The concept of boundary in the Roman garden"
G. CANEVA, "Il giardino come espressione del divino nelle rappresentazioni dell'antica Roma"
R. L. FOX, "Early Christians and the gardens: image and reality"

Weiss, Naomi A. 2014. “The Antiphonal Ending of Euripides' Iphigenia in Aulis (1475–1532).” Classical Philology 109: 119–129.
Livingston, Ivy J. 2014. “Empire Builders, Image Builders: Legacies of the Roman Military.” American Classical League Summer Institute. Program
Schiefsky, Mark. 2014. “Galen and the tripartite soul.” Plato and the Divided Self, edited by Rachel Barney, Tad Brennan, and Charles Brittain, 331–349. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 331–349.
Rau, Jeremy, and N Oettinger. 2014. “The History of the Indo-European Primary Comparative.” Das Nomen im Indogermanischen Morphologie, Substantiv versus Adjektiv, Kollektivum. Wiesbaden: Reichert Verlag.
Roilos, Panagiotis. 2014. “Phantasia and the Ethics of Fictionality in Byzantium: A Cognitive Anthropological Perspective.” Medieval Greek Storytelling: Fictionality and Narrative in Byzantium, edited by P Roilos, 9–30. Wiesbaden: Harrassowitz Verlag, 9–30.
Livingston, Ivy J. 2014. “Pro Cicerone: In Defense of Cicero in the Latin Classroom.” American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages. ProgramAbstract

This session presents a unit of study centered on the life and writings of Cicero, a pivotal figure in Roman history and one of the best-documented. Cicero’s life, intersecting with many of Rome’s best-known figures, provides a perfect point of access to many cultural themes, while engaging students with primary texts of undisputed virtuosity.

Roilos, Panagiotis. 2014. “Unshapely Bodies and Beautifying Embellishments: The Ancient Epics in Byzantium, Allegorical Hermeneutics, and the Case of Ioannes Diakonos Galenos.” Jahrbuch der Österreichischen Byzantinistik, edited by Kislinger Ewald, 64: 231–246. Wien: Verlag der Österreichischen Akademie der Wissenschaften, 64, 231–246.
Coleman, Kathleen. 2014. “Melior's plane tree: an introduction to the ancient garden.” Le jardin dans l’Antiquité, edited by Kathleen Coleman, 1–26. Vandoeuvres: Fondation Hardt, 1–26.
Medieval Greek Storytelling: Fictionality and Narrative in Byzantium
Roilos, Panagiotis, ed. 2014. Medieval Greek Storytelling: Fictionality and Narrative in Byzantium. Wiesbaden: Harrassowitz Verlag. Publisher's VersionAbstract

Written by eminent scholars in the field of Byzantine studies, the majority of the chapters included in Medieval Greek Storytelling: Fictionality and Narrative in Byzantium are revised versions of the papers that were presented at an international conference that Panagiotis Roilos organized at Harvard University in December 2009. The topics explored in the book cover an extensive chronological range of postclassical Greek culture(s) and literature, from early Christianity to early modern Greek literature, with a pronounced focus on the Byzantine period, as well as a variety of genres: hagiography, historiography, chronicles, “patriographic literature,” the novel, the epic, and philological commentary. One of the main aims of the book is to shift the focus of current scholarship on fictionality from those genres that are traditionally identified as “fictional,” such as the novel and the epic, to other literary discourses that lay claim to historical objectivity and veracity. By doing so, this volume as a whole sheds new light on the interpenetration of different, often apparently antithetical discursive categories and strategies and on the ensuing problematization of established demarcations between “historicity” and fictionality, as well as “objectivity” and imaginary arbitrariness, in diverse Byzantine literary and broader cultural contexts.

The Land of the Elephant Kings: Space, Territory, and Ideology in the Seleucid Empire
Kosmin, Paul J. 2014. The Land of the Elephant Kings: Space, Territory, and Ideology in the Seleucid Empire. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 448. Publisher's VersionAbstract

The Seleucid Empire (311–64 BCE) was unlike anything the ancient Mediterranean and Near Eastern worlds had seen. Stretching from present-day Bulgaria to Tajikistan—the bulk of Alexander the Great’s Asian conquests—the kingdom encompassed a territory of remarkable ethnic, religious, and linguistic diversity; yet it did not include Macedonia, the ancestral homeland of the dynasty. The Land of the Elephant Kings investigates how the Seleucid kings, ruling over lands to which they had no historic claim, attempted to transform this territory into a coherent and meaningful space.

Based on recent archaeological evidence and ancient primary sources, Paul J. Kosmin’s multidisciplinary approach treats the Seleucid Empire not as a mosaic of regions but as a land unified in imperial ideology and articulated by spatial practices. Kosmin uncovers how Seleucid geographers and ethnographers worked to naturalize the kingdom’s borders with India and Central Asia in ways that shaped Roman and later medieval understandings of “the East.” In the West, Seleucid rulers turned their backs on Macedonia, shifting their sense of homeland to Syria. By mapping the Seleucid kings’ travels and studying the cities they founded—an ambitious colonial policy that has influenced the Near East to this day—Kosmin shows how the empire’s territorial identity was constructed on the ground. In the empire’s final century, with enemies pressing harder and central power disintegrating, we see that the very modes by which Seleucid territory had been formed determined the way in which it fell apart.

2013
Kosmin, Paul J. 2013. “Alexander the Great and the Seleucids in Iran.” The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Iran, edited by Daniel Potts, 671–689. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 671–689.
Kosmin, Paul J. 2013. “Apologetic Ethnography: Megasthenes' Indica and the Seleucid Elephant.” Ancient Ethnography: New Approaches, edited by Eran Almagor and Joseph Skinner, 97–115. New York: Bloomsbury Academic, 97–115.
Livingston, Ivy J. 2013. “Classical to the Core: Latin as the Lynchpin to the Goals of the Standards.” American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages. ProgramAbstract

This session will illustrate project-based activities in which students become the makers of objects and texts that are shared not only among each other, but with their schools and communities. The projects and their Roman models (monuments, coins) will provide a lens through which students will engage with “big” issues of civic identity and image.

Pages