Prizes

For Undergraduates

Information about all Harvard College prizes may be found on the website of the Prize Office (from which most of the information below is taken). This page highlights those of particular interest to students of the Classics.

Prizes awarded by annual competition

  • Bowdoin Prizes in Classical Greek and Latin for Undergraduates: Information for the 2016–2017 Bowdoin Prizes
    An annual prize of $5,000 is offered for the best translations into Classical Greek or Latin of the selection chosen by the Department of the Classics (see link above). Each manuscript must be delivered to the Department of the Classics, by the deadline, not later than five o'clock in the afternoon.
  • George Emerson Lowell Scholarship Prize: Information for the 2016–17 Undergraduate Lowell Prize Examination
    From the bequest of Judge John Lowell, Class of 1834, and Mrs. Lowell. An annual award for excellence in the Classics, awarded on the basis of an examination which tests, in alternate years, competence in Greek and Latin language and literature. Any undergraduate in the College with sophomore or junior standing is eligible to compete. Refer to the link above for information about this year's exam and how to sign up.
  • John Osborne Sargent Prize for a Latin Translation: Information for the 2016–2017 Sargent Prize
    First offered in 1886–1887 by John Osborne Sargent, Class of 1830, and endowed in his memory, in 1889, by his daughter, Georgianna W. Sargent. For the best metrical translation [students may choose meter] of a lyric poem of Horace, to be selected each year by the Department of the Classics (see link above). Open to Harvard College undergraduates, visiting undergraduates under the Faculty of Arts and Sciences, and admitted Extension School Bachelor Degree candidates.

Prizes awarded to graduating seniors

  • Classics Department Prize: The Department of the Classics awards several prizes annually to seniors who have demonstrated excellence in Latin and/or Greek. No application is necessary.
  • Louis Curtis Prize: From the fund established by Louis Curtis, of the Class of 1870. Awarded annually for excellence in Latin to a senior who has concentrated in any of the fields of concentration of which Latin forms a part. Recommendation for the prize is made by the Department of the Classics on the evidence of excellence in courses in Latin and in such requirements for honors as demonstrate proficiency in Latin. No application is necessary.
  • Richardson Scholarship: From the bequest of William King Richardson, 1880. To a senior for distinction in Greek and Latin, especially reading at sight and composition. No application is necessary.
  • Pease Thesis Prize: Awarded to the best undergraduate thesis in Latin as voted by the faculty of the Department of the Classics. No application is necessary.
  • Smyth Thesis Prize: Awarded to the best undergraduate thesis in Greek as voted by the faculty of the Department of the Classics. No application is necessary.
  • Vermuele Thesis Prize: Awarded to the best undergraduate thesis in Classical Archaeology as voted by the faculty of the Department of the Classics. No application is necessary.
  • David Taggart Clark Prize: From the bequest of David Taggart Clark, Class of 1892. Awarded to the member of the graduating class of Harvard College selected to make the Latin oration at Commencement.
  • Hoopes Prize: From the estate of Thomas T. Hoopes, Class of 1919. For undergraduates on the basis of outstanding scholarly work or research. For further information, please see the Hoopes FAQ or contact the Prize Office at fasprize@fas.harvard.edu or (617) 495-4780.

For Graduate Students

Information about all GSAS prizes may be found on the website of the Prize Office (from which most of the information below is taken). This page highlights those of particular interest to students of the Classics.

Prizes awarded by annual competition

  • Bowdoin Prizes for Graduate Students: Information for the 2016–2017 Bowdoin Prizes
    • Graduate Composition in Greek: An annual prize of $10,000 is offered for an original essay in Classical Greek. The essay may be on any subject chosen by the competitor, and must contain at least 1,000 words. Essays previously presented for other prizes, or for academic recognition elsewhere than in Harvard University, or already published, are not admissible. Dissertations offered for the degree of Ph.D. in Harvard University are admissible. If a thesis chapter is submitted, it must be so modified that it stands alone as a complete essay.

    • Graduate Composition in Latin: An annual prize of $10,000 is offered for an original essay in Classical Latin. The essay may be on any subject chosen by the competitor, and must contain at least 1,000 words. Essays previously presented for other prizes, or for academic recognition elsewhere than in Harvard University, or already published, are not admissible. Dissertations offered for the degree of Ph.D. in Harvard University are admissible. If a thesis chapter is submitted, it must be so modified that it stands alone as a complete essay.